Thirsty­Girl and I took a break and headed for the coast. I had to see the ocean for at least a lit­tle bit… Our prox­im­ity to the oft-discussed-in-motorcycle-circles “Tail of the Dragon” ride on US 129 made it a log­i­cal start to the trip. The dragon is well known around these parts, and is pop­u­lar with both auto and motor­cy­cling enthu­si­asts. There is much lore sur­round­ing the (reported) 318 curves on this 11 mile stretch of road, most of it sur­round­ing the num­ber of deaths this year (appar­ently 8 already in 2012, but I don’t believe this to be accurate..).

See­ing this, I knew we were in for an incred­i­ble ride..

Road sign: Truck Advisory. US 129 South. Switchback curves ahead. Consider alternate routeRoad sign: Truck Advisory. Switchback curves ahead. Consider alternate route (US 129 South)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post Edit:

I man­aged to get some video uploaded.. This is a fairly high-speed ver­sion of the footage I shot from the front of the bike.  It’s pretty shaky due to some vibra­tion prob­lems I hadn’t antic­i­pated and the really twisty-turny stuff starts about 2:40..  Don’t feel bad about fast-forwarding.. Hope you enjoy..

If you can’t watch, or per­haps can’t wait ’till the end, this is what I found at the end of my ride up the hill:  Ooops.

Busted!

Around the cor­ner from my impromptu stop was the Deal’s Gap store which is really the tail of the tail of the dragon, they’ve got a motel, gas sta­tion and a whole pile of sou­venirs and tchotchkes to prove  you’ve been there!

Beyond Deal’s gap, I took a break from US 129 and headed down High­way 82 along the spec­tac­u­larly beau­ti­ful shores of Cheoah Lake. I can say with­out a doubt that this stretch of high­way was even more enjoy­able than the first sec­tion of the day. The curves were equally hair-pinned and bendy, but the drive was just a bit more relaxed with­out the onslaught of oncom­ing traf­fic wan­der­ing across into my lane..

At some point along its length, 28 joins up with High­way 107 and con­tin­ued to inspire awe (at least on my part)..   I shot this photo around 5:30 PM,  just over the South Car­olina border.

Highway 28 and 107 in South Carolina:  Road, motorcycle mirror and open road

High­way 28 and 107 in South Carolina

It was get­ting nearly time to shut down for the night, but I had a few more hours of road to get behind me to keep mov­ing east..   For some rea­son every turn I made to head in the right direc­tion headed me back toward Atlanta..   The most detailed Rand McNally maps I could find failed to list the plethora of actual high­ways that line this coun­try­side, sig­nif­i­cantly adding to the con­fus­ing nav­i­ga­tion sce­nario..  Oh, iPhone maps, yeah, they’re much more con­fus­ing. I digress, but it’s pos­si­ble you’ll hear a rant about them later.

Funny thing with North­ern Geor­gia, in stark con­trast to the beau­ti­ful lit­tle farms that line East Ten­nessee roads, the coun­try­side here was really bar­ren.  Devoid of houses, farms, cities and really any pop­u­la­tion at all.. I finally found my way to the small town of Lavo­nia GA and bed­ded down for the night.

The next day of travel took me through more of north­ern Geor­gia and South­west­ern South Car­olina.  (I know this gets con­fus­ing, have a look at the map and stick with me!). I took the oppor­tu­nity to stop and take a walk through a Civil-War era Con­fed­er­ate ceme­tery in McCormick SC.  For those of you who haven’t had the oppor­tu­nity to wan­der through old-country grave­yards, I’d highly rec­om­mend the expe­ri­ence.   His­tory comes alive when you start see­ing cru­cial his­tor­i­cal dates etched in stone. The thing that struck me was how long peo­ple were liv­ing back in the late 17 and early 1800’s.. Sev­eral of the stones I read were peo­ple that lived well into their 80’s and 90’s, and that’s through the US Civil War!  Who­ever says we’re liv­ing longer today might want to recheck their stats. ;)

Robert Bayless Dean, PVT CO E 13 BATT, SC Infantry, Confederate States Army, Apr 3, 1837, Feb 18, 1905

Robert Bay­less Dean, PVT CO E 13 BATT, SC Infantry, Con­fed­er­ate States Army, Apr 3, 1837, Feb 18, 1905

Lewis Bozeman, Died May 2, 1859, about 88 years old

Lewis Boze­man, Died May 2, 1859, about 88 years old

Elizabeth T. Dean, consort of, Thomas Dean, Born April 8th 1795, Died, October 10th, 1865, Aged 70 years, six months, and 2 days

Eliz­a­beth T. Dean, con­sort of, Thomas Dean, Born April 8th 1795, Died, Octo­ber 10th, 1865, Aged 70 years, six months, and 2 days

Confederate Cross

The whole after­noon took me through some pretty eco­nom­i­cally depressed areas..  I saw very lit­tle in the way of indus­try, com­merce, or any other viable form of income save a bit of farming..

Building for Rent: Bracknell's - This BUILDING may FALL but the QUALITY of our MERCHANDISE - WILL NEVER -

Build­ing for Rent: Bracknell’s — This BUILDING may FALL but the QUALITY of our MERCHANDISEWILL NEVER -

Often, I’d come across vir­tual ghost towns that looked recently-prosperous. It was simul­ta­ne­ously sur­real and sad­den­ing. Cross­ing the state line between South Car­olina and Augusta GA was per­haps the most stark con­trast between have and have-not..  After a half day of pass­ing run-down farms and deserted towns, the sub­urbs of Augusta were incred­i­bly post and well developed..

Augusta itself has seen bet­ter days..   Both of my cam­eras had given up the ghost by the time I got there, but I man­aged to catch a few shots of the Augusta Pow­der Works build­ings where much of the Con­fed­er­ate gun­pow­der and muni­tions were made dur­ing the Civil War.  Much of the area around the pow­der works was incred­i­bly depressed and as I rode around I couldn’t help but think that it deserved much more explo­ration and time with a cam­era and an open ear.

ThirstyGirl at the Augusta Powder Works

Thirsty­Girl at the Augusta Pow­der Works (Now a cot­ton company)

Push­ing on, and after one more speed­ing ticket (a lit­tle more than a hand-slap this time) I finally made it in to Savan­nah and got set­tled for a few days of wan­der­ing..  That, in the next post. This one is already get­ting toooo long. Read Part 2 here if you’d like to continue!

 

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